Speakers - Fletcher Disrupts: Dusting Off Diplomacy

Presenters

culinary Diplomacy: 

Sam Chapple-Sokol, Research Consultant and Culinary Diplomat

Sam Chapple-Sokol is a consultant, researcher, and writer focusing on the field of culinary diplomacy. He worked as a seasonal pastry chef in the White House from 2012 to 2014, and currently works as content manager for Chef José Andrés's ThinkFoodGroup in Washington, DC. Sam earned his master’s degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy in 2012, where he studied conflict resolution and international development. You can read his writing at www.culinarydiplomacy.com and can find him on Twitter @culinarydiplo.

Sam Chapple-Sokol is a consultant, researcher, and writer focusing on the field of culinary diplomacy. He worked as a seasonal pastry chef in the White House from 2012 to 2014, and currently works as content manager for Chef José Andrés's ThinkFoodGroup in Washington, DC. Sam earned his master’s degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy in 2012, where he studied conflict resolution and international development. You can read his writing at www.culinarydiplomacy.com and can find him on Twitter @culinarydiplo.

START-UP DIPLOMACY: 

ERIN EULER, JULIA HANSEN, AND LIZ VAUGHAN, CAMBRIDGE INNOVATION CENTER (CIC)

SCIENCE DIPLOMACY:

Frances Colón, Former Deputy Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary of State, U.S. Department of State 

Frances Colón is the former deputy science and technology adviser to the Secretary of State at the U.S. Department of State (2012 to 2017). In this role, she promoted integration of science and technology into foreign policy dialogues; global advancement of women in science; and innovation as a tool for economic growth around the world. In her role as a science diplomat, Colón led reengagement of scientific collaboration with Cuba and coordinated climate change policy for the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas announced by President Obama. Colón is a graduate of the National Hispana Leadership Institute, fellow of the U.S.-Japan Leadership Program and delegate to the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations Young Leaders Forum.  She is recipient of the Hispanic Heritage Foundation’s 2015 Inspira Award and a Google Science Fair judge. In 2016, Colón was named one of the 20 most influential Latinos in technology. Colón earned her PhD in neuroscience in 2004 from Brandeis University and her BS in biology in 1997 from the University of Puerto Rico. 

Frances Colón is the former deputy science and technology adviser to the Secretary of State at the U.S. Department of State (2012 to 2017). In this role, she promoted integration of science and technology into foreign policy dialogues; global advancement of women in science; and innovation as a tool for economic growth around the world. In her role as a science diplomat, Colón led reengagement of scientific collaboration with Cuba and coordinated climate change policy for the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas announced by President Obama. Colón is a graduate of the National Hispana Leadership Institute, fellow of the U.S.-Japan Leadership Program and delegate to the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations Young Leaders Forum.  She is recipient of the Hispanic Heritage Foundation’s 2015 Inspira Award and a Google Science Fair judge. In 2016, Colón was named one of the 20 most influential Latinos in technology. Colón earned her PhD in neuroscience in 2004 from Brandeis University and her BS in biology in 1997 from the University of Puerto Rico. 

CIC's mission is to change the world through innovation by developing ecosystems that allow exceptional entrepreneurs to create new products and companies better and faster. CIC does this by providing infrastructure (high quality, flexible office space) and by actively building startup communities in the premium locations of future-focused cities. CIC was founded in 1999 in Kendall Square (Cambridge, Massachusetts) and houses more than 1000 companies in close to 50,000 square meters of premium office and co-working space across 8 facilities. CIC companies come from a wide variety of industries, and while our community is composed primarily of startups, it also includes larger companies, investors, and service providers. CIC measures its success through its economic impact. Start-ups housed at CIC have raised over $2.5 billion in venture capital investment and created over $2 billion of publicly disclosed exit value, CIC companies have added an estimated 40,000 jobs to the economy. In Cambridge, this hive of innovation has drawn the four largest venture capital funds in Massachusetts, with a combined $7.1 billion of assets under management, to relocate their headquarters into CIC’s buildings, alongside a number of smaller funds.

CIC's mission is to change the world through innovation by developing ecosystems that allow exceptional entrepreneurs to create new products and companies better and faster. CIC does this by providing infrastructure (high quality, flexible office space) and by actively building startup communities in the premium locations of future-focused cities.

CIC was founded in 1999 in Kendall Square (Cambridge, Massachusetts) and houses more than 1000 companies in close to 50,000 square meters of premium office and co-working space across 8 facilities. CIC companies come from a wide variety of industries, and while our community is composed primarily of startups, it also includes larger companies, investors, and service providers.

CIC measures its success through its economic impact. Start-ups housed at CIC have raised over $2.5 billion in venture capital investment and created over $2 billion of publicly disclosed exit value, CIC companies have added an estimated 40,000 jobs to the economy. In Cambridge, this hive of innovation has drawn the four largest venture capital funds in Massachusetts, with a combined $7.1 billion of assets under management, to relocate their headquarters into CIC’s buildings, alongside a number of smaller funds.

Climate and Sustainable Development Diplomacy:

WILLIAM MOOMAW, Professor Emeritus of International Environmental Policy and co-director, Global Development and Environment Institute, Tufts University 

William Moomaw is emeritus professor of international environmental policy, and co-director of the Global Development and Environment Institute at Tufts University. He founded the Center for International Environmental Policy at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, where he taught for 22 years. He is a physical chemist who has translated environmental and sustainability science into policy relevant information, and initiated the emerging field of sustainable development diplomacy. He was a lead author of five Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports on mitigation of climate change, and has advised the U.S., EU, World Bank, several U.S. state governments, and corporations. He now serves on the boards of five science based NGOs that work on sustainable energy and sustainability issues including climate change,forests, fisheries, and other global issues.

William Moomaw is emeritus professor of international environmental policy, and co-director of the Global Development and Environment Institute at Tufts University. He founded the Center for International Environmental Policy at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, where he taught for 22 years. He is a physical chemist who has translated environmental and sustainability science into policy relevant information, and initiated the emerging field of sustainable development diplomacy. He was a lead author of five Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports on mitigation of climate change, and has advised the U.S., EU, World Bank, several U.S. state governments, and corporations. He now serves on the boards of five science based NGOs that work on sustainable energy and sustainability issues including climate change,forests, fisheries, and other global issues.